Greenberg savors magnificent year

Greenberg savors magnificent year

ARLINGTON -- In the end, the fans rose and saluted the athletes in defeat. It was a defining moment for Rangers managing general partner and chief executive officer Chuck Greenberg, who won't forget what it meant and how it felt.

"The season was over," Greenberg said as he was making the rounds in the home clubhouse at Rangers Ballpark late Monday night, "and 52,000 fans were chanting, 'Let's go, Rangers!' They wanted more.

"This is a season to savor and build off -- and go where this franchise has never been."

A magical run to the first World Series in franchise history had ended in a 3-1 Game 5 loss to Tim Lincecum and his Giants, yet there were few tears shed in the home of the American League champions.


The Rangers understood they had taken this season to new places, for themselves and their fans. The new management team headed by Greenberg and club president Nolan Ryan had every reason to believe this was the start of something big.

"It was a transformational year for the Texas Rangers," Greenberg said. "The hard work had been done for us for a number of years by our exceptional front office, led by [general manager] Jon Daniels and Nolan Ryan.

"This is the beginning of an era. We are moving confidently and aggressively into a very bright future as an organization and a community. All the myths are gone. The organization is committed to winning with a future ahead of it."

The Rangers have a number of personnel decisions to address, and they will do so quickly in response to the new rules associated with free agents, Daniels said.

"We'll sit down tomorrow and debrief a little bit and start planning," Daniels said. "We'll start in earnest tomorrow. With the new rules, guys are free agents five days after the World Series. We have a few days to get our thoughts together."

Daniels, reaching the World Series in his fifth season as GM, said it was "a little too early" to grasp the magnitude of his club's achievement. It had been 11 years between postseason appearances for the Rangers, who knocked off the Rays and Yankees before running into a blazing-hot Giants outfit.

"Two things hit me," Daniels said. "One was looking at the scoreboard and seeing no other teams playing. Then I looked at my watch today and saw it was November.

"It was an outstanding group of guys on and off the field. We have a new ownership group with a new business model of how we're going to complement our core [of talent]. We're not going to stray from our strengths."

The Rangers' farm system has produced a steady flow of premium young talent, and Daniels fully expects that to continue.

"The first thing I said when we won the American League pennant is I wanted to thank our development people and scouts. Those guys have killed it, made great calls.

"We're not going to get away from that. That's the No. 1 reason we got to this point. We're going to stay with our strength."

The focus will be on Cliff Lee, the ace acquired at midseason from Seattle who is eligible for free agency and will attract widespread interest.

But the Rangers have issues to be resolved in other areas, notably at catcher, where Bengie Molina and Matt Treanor are unsigned, and with cleanup man Vladimir Guerrero, who holds a mutual option with the club for 2011.

Greenberg indicated that the club would aggressively bid to fill needs, but he also noted that its strength is the foundation already in place with a wide range of superb young talent in full flower.

"Different circumstances for different times," Greenberg said. "Ten years ago, things were different. We have some good talent, a tremendous farm system. We think we're in a very good position for the future."

Lyle Spencer is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.