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Yanks disagree with Torrealba over sign stealing

Yanks disagree with Torrealba over sign stealing

Yanks disagree with Torrealba over sign stealing
NEW YORK -- As the Yankees have pushed across 24 runs in the first two games of this series, Rangers catcher Yorvit Torrealba has grown a bit suspicious -- paranoid, some Yankees players would say -- that the opposition is stealing his signs.

He confronted Mark Teixeira about it on Tuesday, with the first baseman saying he "didn't have anything." Then, while making a trip to the mound in the fifth inning of the Yankees' 12-4 win on Wednesday night, he shouted at Andruw Jones for allegedly picking up signs and relaying pitch selection while the outfielder was on second base.

That part seemed to irk Yankees manager Joe Girardi.

"He's yelling at one of our guys, and I don't appreciate that," the former catcher said. "I'm going to protect my guys."

Jones said Torrealba "tried to make some excuses for them getting their butt kicked."

"He came out there and yelled that out, and I didn't appreciate it that much," Jones said. "But it's not an excuse when the guy's leaving pitches out over the plate and they're getting hits."

Torrealba acknowledged stealing signs is common in baseball, but added: "When you do it so obvious, you have to say something."

"We could all be wrong, but we could all be right," Torrealba said. "So, I decided to say something. I don't take it personally. I don't take any credit from them. I don't even think they needed to do that. We were making a lot of bad pitches, and they hit a lot of mistakes."

The Yankees, winners of five of their last six, have notched 12 runs in each of the first two games of this series while cranking out 26 hits. On Wednesday, they hit five homers and tagged Rangers starter Derek Holland for six runs in five innings.

Texas skipper Ron Washington, whose club has dropped four straight, said even if the Yankees are stealing signs, "It's not a story."

"You think that's a secret that guys are doing that?" Washington said. "There's a lot of teams out there doing that."

And there's apparently plenty of paranoia.

Teixeira recalled a time in 2005 when he was with the Rangers, and White Sox starter Mark Buehrle blanked them his first time at home, then got lit up in Arlington the next time he faced them. Buehrle had the wild notion that Texas was getting signs from someone in center field, who was then relaying them to the scoreboard operator, who was putting flashing lights in the scoreboard to tip off the home hitters.

"I think sometimes guys get paranoid," Teixeira said. "And you know what, he's a competitor. Torrealba is trying to win a game, and he's trying to figure something out. But I didn't have anything."

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