Relentless Young paces Rangers

Relentless Young paces Rangers

DIAMONDBACKS 9, RANGERS 3
at Surprise, Ariz.
Tuesday, March 4

Rangers at the plate: Michael Young was a thorn in the side of the D-backs early in this one. His single in the first started a two-out rally that led to the first Texas run. In the third he hit his first homer of the spring, a solo shot to right. Marlon Byrd drove in the Rangers' first run in the first when he legged out an infield single.

D-backs at the plate: The D-backs started the first with three straight hits by Eric Byrnes, Emilio Bonifacio and Conor Jackson with Jackson's triple giving them a 2-0 lead. Two outs later, Justin Upton hit his first homer of the spring a line drive to center to cap the four-run inning. Chris Snyder hit his second homer of the spring, a solo shot, in the third. Jackson was right in the middle of the action in the fourth as well, as he hit a grand slam off Kameron Loe.

Rangers on the mound: It was a tough day for Rangers starter Kason Gabbard. The left-hander allowed four runs in the first inning and drilled Bonifacio in the head with a pitch in the second. After allowing a leadoff single in the third he was removed. Things weren't much better for Loe, who allowed five runs (four earned) in 1 2/3 innings.

D-backs on the mound: Ace Brandon Webb made his second start of the spring and the sinkerballer recorded eight of his nine outs on the ground with the other coming on a strikeout. Webb had trouble finishing innings as both of the runs he allowed came with two outs. Reliever Tony Pena made his first appearance of the spring and worked a 1-2-3 sixth inning. Pena had been delayed in the Dominican Republic due to visa issues.

Cactus League records: Rangers 4-2-1; D-backs 3-3-1.

Up next: The Rangers play host to the Brewers at 2:05 p.m. CT on Wednesday with left-hander Matt Harrison, who was acquired from the Braves last July in the Mark Teixeria trade, making his second start of the spring against Dave Bush.

Steve Gilbert is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.