Young to play with hairline fracture

Young to play with hairline fracture

ARLINGTON -- Michael Young is going to play with a hairline fracture in the tip of the ring finger on his left hand.

There may be some pain and discomfort, but he prefers that to going on the disabled list, and he was back in the Rangers' lineup on Saturday night.

"It's business as usual," Young said before the game. "It's a clean crack, I just need to gut it out and keep playing. It will heal itself. It's just a matter of how much pain I can take."

Young injured the finger while lifting weights after Thursday's game. He said he dropped a 45-pound weight on the finger.

"Just smashed it," Young said.

Young tried to take batting practice on Friday, but the pain was too much. An X-ray revealed the fracture and Young missed Friday's game against the Rays. But he was able to take batting practice on Saturday and said the finger was much better.

"We talked about the options," Young said. "They said it will hurt for about 20 days before it heals. Obviously that's the amount of time for a guy on the disabled list, but I told them that's not an option. So it's a matter of how much pain I can tolerate. I just want to make sure I can do everything baseball-wise.

"During the course of your career or the season you are going to have something pop up physically. So you deal with it mentally and get past it. I'm sure I'll get through this and play well. I'm sure I'm not the only one who has to deal with something like this."

Young has been playing well. He took a 21-game hitting streak into Saturday's game, the longest in the Majors this season. It's tied for the fifth longest in club history, seven behind the record set by Gabe Kapler in 2000. Young is second on the list with a 25-game hitting streak in 2005.

Young said he had a similar injury on his other hand in 2001 when he was a rookie and was able to play through it. He has never been on the disabled list in his career.

"If anybody can pull it off, Michael will be the one," manager Ron Washington said.

T.R. Sullivan is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.