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Interview with Ian Kinsler

Interview with Ian Kinsler

Chuck Morgan, voice of Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, interviewed Rangers All-Star Second Baseman Ian Kinsler for the Rangers November Web Chat.

The following is a transcript version of the video.
*Some content in this transcript may have been changed to provide constancy in the conversation.

Hello everybody and welcome to texasrangers.com and this month's web chat. Remember, during the offseason, for everything Rangers baseball, visit texasrangers.com. Our special guest today is Rangers All-Star Second Baseman Ian Kinsler. Ian, how are you doing?

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Ian:
I'm doing well. How are you doing?

Chuck:
Well, I'm doing good. We have some questions for you. All of us now days can be general mangers of baseball teams or football teams with fantasy football. What's the best player you have on your fantasy football team?
Question submitted by: Sarah Garcia

Ian:
All of them, I kill everyone, every week. I would have to go with Jason Whitten as the best player, probably the most consistent player. The next person would be Brandon Jacobs, a running back for the Giants.

Chuck:
Do you make a lot of moves if somebody doesn't work out for you?

Ian:
Absolutely, I had to make a big move at the beginning of the season when Brady went down. He's my guy, he's my first rounder. It kind of hurt me a little bit, but I was able to make a sneaky trade with Chris Davis. I trade him Lawrence Morinie, who's not even playing right now, for Eli Manning and Ronnie Brown. Don't ask how I did it, but I just got it done.

Chuck:
Well, Ronnie Brown had a great day back in September. Did you have him in the starting line up?

Ian:
Yeah, I did. He went off. I think it was four running touchdowns and a passing touchdown and Chris [Davis] didn't like to see that too much.

Chuck:
And the name of Ian Kinsler's fantasy team?

Ian:
Afternoon Delight.

Chuck:
The next question again is about fantasy football. I too play Fantasy Football and love it. Who is your favorite team? I'm a Packers fan myself.
Question submitted by: Ada Boucher

Ian:
Favorite NFL team is the Arizona Cardinals. It's been tough to root for them my whole life, but they're starting to play a little better. Hopefully they can mix in a play off season real soon.

Chuck:
Obviously, I'm a lot older than you, but I used to root for the Cardinals then they left town on me. But I'm glad you're carrying that on for me.

Hey Mr. Kinsler, just wanted to know how your injury was doing and what are you looking forward to seeing in the team next season?
Question submitted by: Dustin Hadley

Ian:
I'm doing well. Everything feels great. I'm ready for the season to begin. As long as I'm getting my work outs in in the weight room and feel comfortable with where I'm at, I'll be fine. The main thing is to be able to get a round of 18 holes in and feel good about my self.

Chuck:
Ian, you had one of the top hitting streaks in baseball all year and then, even towards the end of the season, we looked in the stats and you were still in there, just an incredible year. It's just disappointing for you to go down with the injury.

Ian:
It was disappointing. I kind of wanted to see what I was capable of doing through the whole season. I haven't been able to do that yet in my first three years. That's something that's unusual though the minor leagues, I never really had any injuries. Through college, I never had any injuries. Next year, I'm looking to play from wire to wire and see what I'm capable of doing.

Chuck:
In watching you in these three years, we see you smile a lot and you have a lot of fun. You love playing especially when there's grand slams and home plate stuff like that. Was it tough to sit in the dug out and watch what was going on with the injury?

Ian:
It was very tough. It's especially tough when you're losing ballgames. You feel like you've got be doing something. I tried to keep the guys upbeat. I tried to talk to as many guys as I possibly could. Make sure their heads were right and in the game still. It's always tough to sit on the bench whether you're getting a day off or you're hurt. You don't want to be in that position and hopefully next year I can play 162.

Chuck:
How does the season ending injury affect you mentally going into the long offseason? Does it change your offseason regiment? Thanks for a great year. Can't wait for a healthy 2009!
Question submitted by: Eric Latham

Ian:
No, it's not going to change any of my workouts. I take November off anyway and just relax. I'll probably do some minor things in November as far as rehabbing and making sure my core is strong. Make sure the movement in my leg and my turning movements are normal. That's probably the extent of my rehab that's going to be happening. Other than that, my offseason workout schedule is right in track. I think that's why we choose to do the surgery when we did it.

Chuck:
We had a lot of great moments in 2008 and you had a bunch of those, too. Do you have a favorite moment from the season?

Ian:
That's so hard. We had so many great moments, especially at home. It's tough to choose one, but just being in the first All-Star Game at Yankee Stadium with Josh Hamilton hitting the home runs like he was doing. It was pretty special and something that I'll never forget. You can go on for days with Marlon Byrd's home run against the Yankees and Josh Hamilton's walk off against the Angels. We had a bunch of moments, but I'll probably take Yankee stadium.

Chuck:
Does it ever get hard being a Major League Baseball player and being away from your family?
Question submitted by: Kylee Susler

Ian:
It's tough. It's tough on the road. You get the short road trips, which aren't that bad. You go for six days and you're back home. But when you had the extended road trips that last a little while and you have nothing to do on your day off and you're sitting there thinking about your family, it's tough.

I had my first kid in November so I don't what that's going to be like being away from her. It's probably going to be tough but I think my wife is planning on a few more trips this year.

Chuck:
On August 14th I experienced my first game at Fenway. It was Rangers vs. Red Sox. The game, environment, everything was amazing. I've been able to experience the fan's perspective at Fenway, but I was wondering what it is like to experience your first time at Fenway as an MLB player?
Question submitted by: Marianna Arana

Ian:
I didn't really know what to expect going in there my rookie season. I'd been to Yankee Stadium going up, my dad's from New York, so I knew what that was all about. I figured [Fenway] would be something similar but it's kind of on its own level. Very exciting place to play baseball, it's small, and not a lot of people there, but it feels like there are a lot of people there. I think that's what's so special about it, every game you play its packed, sold out. The fans understand baseball, they know what to root for and when to root for it, when to boo and when to cheer. It's just a special place to play baseball and I enjoy it.

Chuck:
We talked to Michael [Young] last month about some of the fun you guys had this season. One of those nights was at Shea Stadium when you all went out and did a little slide on the tarp. Talk about how all of that came about.

Ian:
I don't know how it came about, it just kind of happened. We were on the road and I think it was the first time we were rained out last season. And I kind of just said 'lets see if we can get out there on the tarp and run around.' And you know Milton Bradley being himself said 'if you want to get on ESPN, you go out there and tarp slide.' We all looked at each other and decided to go do it. We went out there and had a pretty good time with the crowd. It was a memorable night.

Chuck:
The Shea Stadium security guys, they looked like they were pretty cool with that.

Ian:
They were at first and then they wanted to kick us off, they were trying to pull us off the tarp. They had us in the dug out and we said we wanted to go one more time so we took off by them and went for one last slide.

Chuck:
How did it feel watching Josh Hamilton knock out 28 homeruns in the first round of the homerun derby at the All-Star Game?
Question submitted by: Emily Duc

Can you talk more about your first All-Star experience and how you felt when you first found out you were selected and everything? Who called you?

Ian:
Well, I found out from Wash[ington] and I found out with Mike Young and we were in Baltimore. [Washington] called us both into the office and he congratulated both of us. I really didn't have anything to say, I just sat there and looked at both of them. I'll remember that whole day for being my first All-Star Game and it being in Yankee Stadium was extra special for me and my family, because my dad's from there. He grew up basically 10 minutes from Yankee Stadium. It was extra special for him and extra special for me. It's crazy to think that stadium no longer exists but next year the new stadium is going to be first class.

Chuck:
What things do you do to help you stay focused when you play second base?
Question submitted by: Eli Acosta

Ian:
I try to think about the next pitch that should be called in my mind. It might not happen but, it's kind of like a chess game, trying to think about what move should be made next. When there are runners on base, you have to think about how fast they are and how fast the hitter is. What happens if he hits a ball in the game? What happens if it's a double play ball? There are a ton of things to think about in between every pitch and when no one is on base, I basically just think of what pitch I would call. I try to keep relaxed and maybe look in the stands every once and a while to see what's going on and then get focused again.

Chuck:
We talked to Michael [Young] last month about Rudy Jaramillo. How much has Rudy helped you?

Ian:
Rudy is unbelievable. We talk about it amoungest ourselves and amoungest the hitters about how good he is at job and I don't think it really has anything to do with him being the greatest teacher of hitting mechanics. He's obviously good at it, he understands a swing, he understands everyone's swing, but I think mentally and emotional he's so positive and he makes you feel like you're the best hitter in the league every game. I think that's what makes him special and why he is the best in the game.

Chuck:
I'm going to ask you the same thing I asked Mike, does he ever get mad at you?

Ian:
Yes he does, in his own way. I make him smile after he gets mad at me, so it's not a big deal but he's still Rudy Jaramillo, he's still got that fire in him. Though out games you can see him get fired up and he does it the right way, he gets in someone's face but he's always positive saying 'you're better than what you're showing right now.' He's got that ability to influence you in that way and make you play harder.

Chuck:
Well, Ian, we want to wish you the best of luck to Afternoon Delight, hope you have a great season with you being the General Manager and all. All the best to your family and we appreciate your time today.

Ian:
Thank you.

Chuck:
All-Star Second Baseman Ian Kinsler right here at texasrangers.com. We invite you to join us next month for a special surprise here at texasrangers.com and, don't forget, even during the offseason for everything Rangers Baseball, visit texasrangers.com.

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