Stress reaction delaying Kinsler's return to lineup

Stress reaction delaying Kinsler's return to lineup

ARLINGTON -- Second baseman Ian Kinsler was hoping he would need just the minimum of 15 days on the disabled list to recover from a bruised right ribcage. That is not going to be the case.

Kinsler, who is eligible to be activated Sunday, had an MRI earlier this week and the results showed a stress reaction in the ribcage. That is similar but not quite as serious as a stress fracture.

The bottom line is that Kinsler is going to need at least two more weeks and maybe longer before he is ready to return. A medical rehabilitation assignment in the Minor Leagues will also likely be needed, because Kinsler, who hasn't played since May 17, isn't able to do any baseball activities.

"This is just something that has materialized over a period of time," general manager Jon Daniels said.

Kinsler, a three-time All-Star, was hitting .302 with 24 runs scored, seven home runs and 20 RBIs in 40 games before going down with the injury. Elvis Andrus has been handling the leadoff spot while Jurickson Profar and Leury Garcia have been splitting time at second base.

"We miss Kinsler a lot," manager Ron Washington said. "We miss his presence and what he brings to our offense. You have to give credit to Profar and Leury. They've done a good job. We're still winning ballgames, but of course, we miss Kinsler."

Profar started at second base on Wednesday. It's the seventh time he's started in the last nine games, including six times at second base. He also made one start at shortstop when Andrus was given a day off on Sunday in Seattle.

Washington said Profar and Garcia will continue to share the position, but Washington admitted Profar will likely get more playing time than Garcia.

"The time won't be split evenly, but they are both going to play," Washington said. "I have to try and keep Leury involved."

T.R. Sullivan is a reporter for MLB.com. Read his blog, Postcards from Elysian Fields, and follow him on Twitter @Sullivan_Ranger. Master Tesfatsion is an associate reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.